Category Archives: BUDGET-FRIENDLY

May 20, 2013

Suitcase Toy Storage

A few weeks ago I shared a few finds from a local antique show, one of those being this set of suitcases (there are actually three of them).
Use Suitcases as Storage Beneath a Bed | Cape27Blog.com

 I had planned to keep them in their original mustard yellow color and use them as toy storage for Zoey. However, when we got them home they were looking super dingy next to all the other bright yellows in her room. So, we decided to give them a new look!

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

I picked up a quart of basic latex paint in a coral semigloss, to match her ceiling color (BM-Pink Polka Dot), and painted away!

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

I completely skipped sanding and priming and did about two and half coats per suitcase. Really, I wouldn’t recommend skipping those steps. The paint seemed to need a bit more to cling to, so if I were to do it again, I’d sand and prime.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

Since the suitcases have a texture to them already, using a brush didn’t leave any visible brush strokes.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

After leaving them to dry overnight, I attached a few casters to the bottoms. We’re planning to use the luggage as storage for barbies, dolls, etc. under Zoey’s bed, so the casters make it easy for her to pull them out by herself. I suppose you could screw the casters to the bottoms, but I just used a little super glue to keep things simple.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

And because I like to make all things pretty, I popped on a few bookplates to label each suitcase.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

 So much better.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

Time to put these babies to work!

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

The insides of the suitcases were in excellent condition. A little musty, but nothing a little airing out couldn’t handle. I just wiped them down really well. I’m a little smitten with how they look placed under the bed.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

And the colors tie in really nicely with the coral shades in Zoey’s pillow and the same shade on the ceiling.

Repurpose Vintage Suitcases as Toy Storage Beneath the Bed | Cape27Blog.com

How about you guys? Repurposing anything lately? Giving an old piece a new look? We hit up the antique show again this weekend.. no luck :(

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May 13, 2013

Peekaboo Pallet Ceiling

If you follow me on Instagram than you may have already had a little sneak peek at today’s topic. It was a little spontaneous on our part, but super quick and easy!

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

Yep, we’re jumping back on the pallet wood bandwagon for a second ride. This time, with our front porch ceiling. When we wrapped up painting in the porch area it was still looking a little dull. We’d imagined painting the ceiling in a lighter gray (to match above the garage) and do something similar by trimming it out in charcoal.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

But as we got to painting.. we realized the ceiling was in pretty bad shape. I mean, it’s a porch ceiling.. so really, we’re probably the only ones to notice. But that’s all part of making your home a space YOU love, right? So instead of just living with the “meh” ceiling, we put the leftover stack of pallet wood from the living room to work!

The wood was already disassembled, sanded, and stained, so the process flew by. Ricky just nailed each piece directly into the ceiling.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

Since the ceiling was already sporting a few trim pieces around the edges, it would have been really difficult to get a clean edge with the new wood. Instead, we just cut the palette pieces a few inches shorter than the width of the ceiling and then sort of “framed everything out” with more wood to cover on top. Here’s a shot of the wood prior to the framing stage. You can see, the edges don’t need to line up because it’ll all just get covered.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

It’s really similar to what we did in the living room. Of course, if you have a completely flat surface (no surrounding trim) then you could just cut the new pieces to size. I’m really liking the whole frame effect though (see below). Makes it feel a little more custom maybe? Oh and funny story about the light, we had always envisioned replacing it with something more fun, for a statement piece. But we’re LOVING the way it looks now against the wood. The black really pops. Consider it a keeper.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

I call it the peekaboo pallet ceiling because from a distance you hardly notice it, if at all.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

Closer…

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

But then you’re on the porch and BAM. Pallet ceiling, in your face.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

I really wish I could share our house numbers project with you (from nearly six months ago).. but that would require, you know, sharing our house numbers. Basically, we took a piece of (guess) pallet wood, trimmed down, and glued a few of these super modern, yet inexpensive house numbers (if you know house numbers, you know that’s hard to find) on it vertically. It looks amazingly fancy and custom and I heart it. You can see where we have it below. The pallet really pops agains the charcoal porch column and the numbers are oil rubbed bronze, tying in nicely with the door hardware.. and everything else on the porch. And now I just wrote an entire paragraph about something you can’t see. Nevermind.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

Something you can see – we finally got around to planting a few flowers in the vertical wall planter. We scored some all-shade flowers this year, so hopefully we have better luck.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

Oh, and since this post has gone crazy random.. we also replaced the white doorbell with this one.

Front Porch Pallet Wood Ceiling | Cape27Blog.com

It’s the little things :)

April 24, 2013

Lovin’ on Summer Nights

Last year we whipped up an art solution for the dining room, and as if that entire process wasn’t enough of a headache, we were still on the fence about the end result. I loved the pattern that the stencil brought to the space, but it still seemed a bit boring. The proportions weren’t right either. I had hoped for a piece that was wider, to better fill the space between the open shelves, but we struggled to find large enough paper to fit the bill. And strike three – I love color, but green wasn’t the way to go. I really wanted something deeper, with dimension to draw you into that back wall. Despite all of this, I convinced myself to live with the art for a few months and then regroup.

Dining Room | Cape27Blog.com

I finally just ripped the entire thing off the wall a few weeks ago, forcing myself to either come up with a new solution or stare at a blank wall. When I dislike something, design wise, going back to the blank slate is my best defense. It’s crazy how long I can live with something that I despise, but as long as something is filling the space, I make do. It’s probably not the best for my mental health, but removing the art all together was a new constant reminder to just figure it out already!

So, figure it out I did. SO. MUCH. BETTER.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

The frames we already had on hand. They’re these from Ikea, which we personalized with a few coats of leftover paint on the mats. I’d been dying to give this a try ever since recommending that a client do something similar in their living space. This was the perfect opportunity! The color is Ben Moore’s Summer Nights and I’m obsessed with it. I’m loving the moodiness that it brings to the space.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

I debated between using this color or the navy that we used in the hall bath. Honestly, I think either would’ve done the job just fine. Both colors tie in perfectly with the throw pillow on the bench seat.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

And the frames are exactly what I had in mind as far as proportions go.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

As for what’s in them, let’s take a closer look! Try to ignore the dust 😉

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

I wanted something graphic, but neutral in color since the mats themselves would demand so much attention. After stumbling upon one of these awesome 20″ x 30″ map prints of Cincinnati, I knew it’d be perfect. I love my city and what better way to display that! I trimmed the larger map down into four smaller squares that fit together a lot like a puzzle. So, when you take a step back they all sort of work together. Probably not the way to go if you’re in need of directions (not to mention these maps date back to 1944).. but for the dining room, it’s beautiful and it works.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

The squares ended up about 9″x9″ and the extra area within the mat is filled with leftover 12″ x 12″ white scrapbook paper. My favorite section is the lower right, with a large portion of the Ohio River running through it. So pretty. Well, on the map at least. In person? Oh no. Mud-fest.

Paint Basic Frame Mats with a Bold Color | Cape27Blog.com

How about you guys? Any art switcheroos going on? Working in the yard? Please tell me you’re experiencing this crazy weather outside of the Cincinnati area.. Shorts one day, heavy jacket the next. Is this spring? I don’t remember spring being like this.. Please, make it stop.

April 11, 2013

Kitchen Cabinet Makeover


When we first began contemplating Ikea’s Adel cabinets for our kitchen remodel, I’ll admit I had a few reservations. One of those being, the glass upper cabinets. With Ikea’s cabinets, the specific door style/color determines the type of glass. And with each color, comes a different glass type. Check out their styles here to see what I mean. And with the Adel cabinets that we preferred in the white finish, that glass style had a ribbed/bubble-ish finish. It’s not good.. at all.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

In fact, I despised it. But we convinced ourselves that we’d eventually swap out the glass (somehow) and took the plunge.

One year later, and we finally worked up the courage to make the switch. This project definitely falls into the category of those “Why didn’t we do this earlier??” changes. And I really want to emphasize how crazy easy and inexpensive this was, because I know just how awful that glass appears and how quickly it can turn potential buyers down. We were almost those buyers.

First, let’s take a look at the back of the cabinet.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Basically a small piece of wood trim (maybe z shaped?) holds the glass in place, while disguising the unfinished edges of the cabinet.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

When you look up close in person, you can see a few small nails holding that piece of trim in place. They’re a few inches apart and super tiny. Removing them was about as easy as it gets. I just used a small knife I had on hand, but anything strong with a very slim blade will work, and slid it under the trim.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Gently bend it inwards and the trim slowing begins to detach. Once you have a few nail sections removed you could probably just use your hands to pull it away, but since we were planning to reuse the material I stuck with the knife, in fear that I might snap the trim.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Here you can see just how tiny the nails are. They are impossible to grip and remove, so we just hammered them in a bit, level to the surface.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Once you have all the trim removed, which took me about 15 minutes for all four cabinet doors, they’ll start to look like this. Then you’ll want to use a razor knife around the edges of the glass, to separate it from the silicone adhesive.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Replacing the old glass with a clear glass is just about as easy as reversing the previous steps. We picked up our new glass doors from Home Depot for about $7 each (they’ll cut them to size, free of charge, if you have your dimensions handy). The employee that we spoke with said that this specific glass is typically used for frames, so it’s definitely thinner than the previous glass. We aren’t particularly rough on the cabinets, plus they have dampers (no slamming), so they’re working just fine for us. Just something to consider if that’s not your case.

We used this clear silicone to reattach the new glass to the cabinets as well as reattaching the trim pieces back to the cabinet. You’ll want to go slow with this step, as not to over glue, but you can always chip away excess with a razor knife after everything dries.

Now, before I show the after pics (with a spoiler), let’s talk about the second half of this post! I’ve been dying to get my hands on the back of these glass cabinets ever since we first purchased them. And replacing the old glass with a clear version was the perfect opportunity to showcase something fun. So we went with painting the backs with color! I mulled over a few options, but ultimately decided that I preferred the look of only the back of the cabinet painted, versus the sides and shelves as well.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

I simply taped off the edges and rolled on a few coats of paint (I used the $6 sample pints from Sherwin Williams). And for the sake of keeping things real, I’ll show you my first attempt at a fun color… SW-Melange Green. I thought green was the way to go, and maybe it was, but not this shade.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

It was fluorescent. Not exactly what I was going for. The next day I quickly painted over it with a color I already had on hand (go figure) from painting our kitchen step stool – Ben Moore’s Yellow Brick Road. I’m fully convinced that yellow works better in the space. There are already a number of green accessories, so the yellow is a nice break. It actually look a little brighter here than the green, but that’s just the camera playing tricks on you. Plus, it tames down when the doors are closed, shelves are in, and dishes are in place.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Speaking of, we also swapped out the glass shelves with solid white ones.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

Andddd…. Here’s how we’re looking now!

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

I’m in love with the white dishes popping off the yellow background. And hello! You can finally see into the cabinets! The left cabinet has all of our daily dishes in it, and the right is more for larger mixing and serving bowls.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

I’m not really liking the color on color of the right cabinet, so I’m thinking of mixing in a few white pieces with a few colorful pieces on each side. We’ll see. I’m sure it’s something that I’ll play around with over time.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

Either way… SO much better than the before pic.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

April 4, 2013

Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial

When we first bought our home, just over a year ago, I was immediately drawn to all of it’s potential – possibilities for an open floor plan, one floor living, and enough outdated finishes to go around. One thing we’ve really enjoyed bringing into the home is character. Things like crown molding, solid-core craftsman doors, beadboard in the bathroom, and built-ins galore. I love ranch style homes, but that doesn’t mean we can’t infuse a few other styles as well. My all-time favorite upgrade we’ve made, that isn’t so “typical ranch”, is craftsman-inspired door trim. I say inspired because we’re definitely not experts, and who knows if we’re doing anything by the books here, but we really love the look and hope you guys can gain some inspiration from it too!

I’m almost positive that the only time I’ve shown our door trim here on the blog was while featuring our new front door. Which is a shame. Seriously. It’s beautiful, and I’m a little perplexed at what’s taken me so long to write this post.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

I mean, it’s everywhere in our house. Yet, somehow I’ve mistakenly hidden it.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

The day we finished trimming out the all the bedroom doors in the hallway was a little like Christmas for me.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

I love the simplicity, yet bulkiness of it all. And pair it with our new three-panel doors and we’re in business.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

So, since we’re in the midst of remodeling the laundry room, which just so happens to have FOUR doors, I thought it’d be a good time to share the whole process in action! It’s crazzy easy. Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

First up, a look at the wood selection. (twss)

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

We used three different sizes to frame out the entire door, as illustrated above. Rather than try to describe where each piece was used and probably lose everyone in the process, I’ll just show pics. It’s not rocket science 😉

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Ricky did most all of the work here, and after a little trial and error, he found it easiest to start by assembly the two side pieces.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

And instead of following up with the top portion directly to the wall, he built it independently first. A nail gun got the job done here.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

And he was left with this.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Slap that guy up at the top of your door frame anddd voila! Instant character.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Easy enough?

Obviously, we still have painting to do here, which we’re holding off on until all the trim work is done, but you guys get the picture. I love all these finishing touches. The end is in sight!