Category Archives: Kitchen

April 11, 2013

Kitchen Cabinet Makeover


When we first began contemplating Ikea’s Adel cabinets for our kitchen remodel, I’ll admit I had a few reservations. One of those being, the glass upper cabinets. With Ikea’s cabinets, the specific door style/color determines the type of glass. And with each color, comes a different glass type. Check out their styles here to see what I mean. And with the Adel cabinets that we preferred in the white finish, that glass style had a ribbed/bubble-ish finish. It’s not good.. at all.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

In fact, I despised it. But we convinced ourselves that we’d eventually swap out the glass (somehow) and took the plunge.

One year later, and we finally worked up the courage to make the switch. This project definitely falls into the category of those “Why didn’t we do this earlier??” changes. And I really want to emphasize how crazy easy and inexpensive this was, because I know just how awful that glass appears and how quickly it can turn potential buyers down. We were almost those buyers.

First, let’s take a look at the back of the cabinet.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Basically a small piece of wood trim (maybe z shaped?) holds the glass in place, while disguising the unfinished edges of the cabinet.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

When you look up close in person, you can see a few small nails holding that piece of trim in place. They’re a few inches apart and super tiny. Removing them was about as easy as it gets. I just used a small knife I had on hand, but anything strong with a very slim blade will work, and slid it under the trim.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Gently bend it inwards and the trim slowing begins to detach. Once you have a few nail sections removed you could probably just use your hands to pull it away, but since we were planning to reuse the material I stuck with the knife, in fear that I might snap the trim.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Here you can see just how tiny the nails are. They are impossible to grip and remove, so we just hammered them in a bit, level to the surface.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Once you have all the trim removed, which took me about 15 minutes for all four cabinet doors, they’ll start to look like this. Then you’ll want to use a razor knife around the edges of the glass, to separate it from the silicone adhesive.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

Replacing the old glass with a clear glass is just about as easy as reversing the previous steps. We picked up our new glass doors from Home Depot for about $7 each (they’ll cut them to size, free of charge, if you have your dimensions handy). The employee that we spoke with said that this specific glass is typically used for frames, so it’s definitely thinner than the previous glass. We aren’t particularly rough on the cabinets, plus they have dampers (no slamming), so they’re working just fine for us. Just something to consider if that’s not your case.

We used this clear silicone to reattach the new glass to the cabinets as well as reattaching the trim pieces back to the cabinet. You’ll want to go slow with this step, as not to over glue, but you can always chip away excess with a razor knife after everything dries.

Now, before I show the after pics (with a spoiler), let’s talk about the second half of this post! I’ve been dying to get my hands on the back of these glass cabinets ever since we first purchased them. And replacing the old glass with a clear version was the perfect opportunity to showcase something fun. So we went with painting the backs with color! I mulled over a few options, but ultimately decided that I preferred the look of only the back of the cabinet painted, versus the sides and shelves as well.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

I simply taped off the edges and rolled on a few coats of paint (I used the $6 sample pints from Sherwin Williams). And for the sake of keeping things real, I’ll show you my first attempt at a fun color… SW-Melange Green. I thought green was the way to go, and maybe it was, but not this shade.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

It was fluorescent. Not exactly what I was going for. The next day I quickly painted over it with a color I already had on hand (go figure) from painting our kitchen step stool – Ben Moore’s Yellow Brick Road. I’m fully convinced that yellow works better in the space. There are already a number of green accessories, so the yellow is a nice break. It actually look a little brighter here than the green, but that’s just the camera playing tricks on you. Plus, it tames down when the doors are closed, shelves are in, and dishes are in place.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Speaking of, we also swapped out the glass shelves with solid white ones.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

Andddd…. Here’s how we’re looking now!

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

I’m in love with the white dishes popping off the yellow background. And hello! You can finally see into the cabinets! The left cabinet has all of our daily dishes in it, and the right is more for larger mixing and serving bowls.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

I’m not really liking the color on color of the right cabinet, so I’m thinking of mixing in a few white pieces with a few colorful pieces on each side. We’ll see. I’m sure it’s something that I’ll play around with over time.

Paint the Backs of Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

 

Either way… SO much better than the before pic.

Replace Adel Cabinets With Clear Glass | Cape27Blog.com

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April 4, 2013

Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial

When we first bought our home, just over a year ago, I was immediately drawn to all of it’s potential – possibilities for an open floor plan, one floor living, and enough outdated finishes to go around. One thing we’ve really enjoyed bringing into the home is character. Things like crown molding, solid-core craftsman doors, beadboard in the bathroom, and built-ins galore. I love ranch style homes, but that doesn’t mean we can’t infuse a few other styles as well. My all-time favorite upgrade we’ve made, that isn’t so “typical ranch”, is craftsman-inspired door trim. I say inspired because we’re definitely not experts, and who knows if we’re doing anything by the books here, but we really love the look and hope you guys can gain some inspiration from it too!

I’m almost positive that the only time I’ve shown our door trim here on the blog was while featuring our new front door. Which is a shame. Seriously. It’s beautiful, and I’m a little perplexed at what’s taken me so long to write this post.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

I mean, it’s everywhere in our house. Yet, somehow I’ve mistakenly hidden it.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

The day we finished trimming out the all the bedroom doors in the hallway was a little like Christmas for me.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

I love the simplicity, yet bulkiness of it all. And pair it with our new three-panel doors and we’re in business.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

So, since we’re in the midst of remodeling the laundry room, which just so happens to have FOUR doors, I thought it’d be a good time to share the whole process in action! It’s crazzy easy. Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

First up, a look at the wood selection. (twss)

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

We used three different sizes to frame out the entire door, as illustrated above. Rather than try to describe where each piece was used and probably lose everyone in the process, I’ll just show pics. It’s not rocket science ;)

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Ricky did most all of the work here, and after a little trial and error, he found it easiest to start by assembly the two side pieces.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

And instead of following up with the top portion directly to the wall, he built it independently first. A nail gun got the job done here.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

And he was left with this.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Slap that guy up at the top of your door frame anddd voila! Instant character.

Simple Craftsman Door Trim Tutorial | Cape27Blog.com

Easy enough?

Obviously, we still have painting to do here, which we’re holding off on until all the trim work is done, but you guys get the picture. I love all these finishing touches. The end is in sight!

February 27, 2013

Practicality Wins.

Remember these barstools?

Kitchen Remodel on a Budget | Cape27Blog.com

Well, they didn’t work out as planned. I guess you can’t win every time. We actually ran into several problems with them before we finally pulled the plug and listed them on Craigslist. Issues starting popping up, umm… the day we got them. We loved the design, but they sat at 24″ inches, which just felt a little too low for our 37″ island counters. When it comes down to it, this was really just an error on our part since Overstock sells the same barstool in a ‘bar height’ versus the shorter ‘counter height’ that we ordered. So they could have worked in that department, had we measured correctly and really thought it through.

That being said, we didn’t beat ourselves up over it too long before we realized a longer list of issues. Nothing major, more just inconveniences. The seats didn’t have backs. It’s so weird to list this as a con, because one of the original must-haves on our hunt for barstools was something backless. I preferred the open feel that a bar stool without a back had. The kitchen is one of the first spaces you see when you enter our home and it’s open to several other rooms. A backless bar stool was nice aesthetically, in that it allowed the eye to pass through it and see directly into the kitchen. On the flip side, and obviously the more important side of things, we have little kids. Very little kids, a two year old and an 11 month old. It’s going to be a VERY long time before they (and hopefully future kiddos) can sit steadily in an open back chair. We realized this quickly and knew the change had to be made.

To top off these problems, I ran into one myself. Like I mentioned earlier, the kitchen is centrally located. We spend a WHOLE lot of time in here, specifically, me sitting at the island. I like to write up grocery lists, to-do lists, pay bills, and work on small crafty projects here. Since it’s directly next to the office, all of my supplies are right at hand, and it’s also next to the living room, which is where the girls find themselves playing most of the time. Read: It’s the only place I can be and get anything done. Now… try spending more than ten minutes in those cold, hard chairs. Doesn’t happen. Especially not in the dead of winter. Get me a blanket, I’m snuggling on the floor with the girls.

And that epically long detailing of why our previous bar stools didn’t work, leads me to these.

Kitchen Remodel on a Budget | Cape27Blog.com

After two weeks without bar stools (we thought we’d narrowed it down to the one, we sold our previous stools, and then realized we didn’t like the new ones we’d landed on) we finally compromised on Ikea’s Henriksdale with a gray seat/back cover. And if anyone is wondering, we went with the shorter Henriksdale, at 26″ seat height. Yep, only two inches taller than our previous bar stools. And it makes a serious difference.

Kitchen Remodel on a Budget | Cape27Blog.com

We considered a few other options, including this one from Overstock, but decided that the size of the Ikea option was the way to go (the Overstock only came with a 30″ seat height). We also fell hard for this bar stool, but it was WAY out of our price range. We’re thinking it’d be fun to refinish the legs on ours to achieve a similar look though. We even thought some fun nailhead trim would be cool, except we’d loose the slipcover feature if we chose to do that.

Kitchen Remodel on a Budget | Cape27Blog.com

The slipcover option will probably win over the nailhead considering the damage Zoey has already done (a run through the washing machine and they’re like new). She’s been having way too much fun enjoying her new ‘big girl chairs’. And I won’t lie, having her at the island during breakfast and lunch is such a time saver. Clean up is a breeze, especially with our new trash can/cabinet hack. I literally just wipe down the entire island straight into the garbage. It’s amazing.

Kitchen Remodel on a Budget | Cape27Blog.com

The new barstools ended up running us about $100 each, $70 for the chair frame and $30 for the cover (not sure why the frame is listed at $80 on Ikea’s website, but it was cheaper in store). Plus, we sold our previous three bar stools at $75 for the set, so that knocked down our ‘out of pocket’ cost to $75 per chair. Not bad.

How about you guys? Any design mistakes lately? Anyone switching out decor for something more practical?

Pssst- I just finished Zoey’s new headboard (literally minutes ago) and I’m dying to share it!! Hoping for next week! 

February 18, 2013

How to Add Interior Drawers to Kitchen Cabinets

Ohhh yeaaa. You know what time it is. The long awaited, oh so intriguing drawer tutorial. For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, we’re about to get crazy up in here with step-by-step instructions on how we added interior drawers to our kitchen cabinets.

For the rest of our kitchen organization process visit here, here, and here

But first, a little history. Last time I touched on this I mentioned looking into buying Ikea’s drawers. We have Ikea cabinets so it only made sense to buy the interior fittings that they offered. Except, when we had it priced out we discovered that it would run us around $200 for the first cabinet and it wasn’t even possible for the pantry cabinet. Umm. What? No.

So, we opted to make them ourselves :)

Add Interior Drawers to Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Let’s break these babies down.

Yep, I’m about to go all Ana White on you. I’m not even addressing the possibly that you may not know who that is. Time to come out from underneath the rocks people. Oh heyyyy, there you are :)

Make Interior Drawers for Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

We didn’t take any real-life photos of the process (bad blogger, bad), so I’ve resorted to Google Sketchup to help us out. It may be easier to understand anyway. I’ll do my best :)

Alrighty. Good to know – The inside of the cabinet we were working with (a tall pantry cab) measured 28″ W x 24″D, so you’ll need to make adjustments to your measurements accordingly. Our finished product measured 25 3/4″ W x 23″D x 6″H.

Make Interior Drawers for Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

If you explode the drawer a bit, you can see that it’s really just a simple box. The entire structure was made from 1/2″ plywood, strong enough to support the contents but light enough not to weight down the drawer slides (more on that in a sec). Rick made all the cuts before assembling anything, and then used a pilot bit with a counter sink and wood screws to combine the pieces. Patience is key here. The wood isn’t very thick, so you’ll want to make sure the screws go in as straight as possible to prevent the wood from splintering.

Make Interior Drawers for Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Once the box was assembled he filled all the holes with wood putty, and sanded the entire piece with a 120 grit orbital sander for a super smooth finish. We choose to paint our drawers white with Sherwin Williams Pro Classic (leftover trim paint from the kitchen) but a fun pop of color or a wood stain would look really nice too!

Next up drawer slides. You’ll want to purchase these before you even begin to think about measurements of the drawers. And please, don’t cheap out on these. There’s nothing worse than beautiful drawers that won’t open and close properly or fall off the track every time you use them. Ugh. Trust me. The instructions included with ours provided the exact amount of space that they would require, width wise. So it was more of less just a little math.

In order to allow clearance for the drawers to be pulled out without interfering with the doors on the cabinets, we added 1×2′s between the drawer slides and the cabinet base. Very important step if you want your drawers to actually open :)

Make Interior Drawers for Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

We used some leftover 1×2′s for this step. See that empty space between the drawer and the yellow 1×2? That’s where the drawer slides will live.

Make Interior Drawers for Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

We also added a few notched out pull handles in our drawers. Again, super easy. Rick just made a few measurements (our handles measure about 5 1/2″ at the widest point) and used a jigsaw to make the cuts. Definitely not necessary, but it was something that made the drawers feel a little more custom for us and less like a giant box :)

Are you still with me? Any kitchen organization going on with you guys? Anyone inspired to get out there and build some drawers? Or did I just bore you to death with numbers? Ha :)

February 4, 2013

Organizing the Kitchen (part three)

What up fools. Just kidding.

Continuing today with the third and final post on our newly organized kitchen (catch up with the first and second here). Throughout our entire space, the lower cabinets were probably underutilized the most. For example, this cabinet directly beside the pantry:

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

With the exception of a cake pop maker and a random sponge (?), we’d pretty much ignored this cabinet altogether. It’s not that we didn’t need the storage space, but more that it was just annoying to bend over just to be able to see into the shelves. Let alone, actually accessing the things in the back of the cabinet – not happening.  So, just as we did in the pantry, Ricky whipped up a few interior drawers. Since we didn’t have much in this area to begin with, I deemed the top drawer a baking section. If you didn’t notice throughout the previous posts, baking materials were thoughtlessly scattered throughout the entire kitchen. Welcome home cup cakes.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

I didn’t line these drawers as I had with the others, but it may be something I do in the future. I access these drawers a lot less, so it seemed kind of excessive. And a little pricy since they’re larger and would require more than just scraps of fabric. I’m still loving the clear drawer dividers though. Maybe I’ll try wrapping paper without the contact paper. Who knows. It could get crazy.

The bottom drawer is a work in progress. It’s definitely getting more use than before, but still a little mix matched. Toaster, mixing bowls, air fresheners/ candles, extra bottle drainer, vegetable oil. It seems so much better when I type this. No, no it doesn’t.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Moving on. We have a second lower cabinet to the left of the range, which also had a few shelves. In here, we just removed one of the shelves and used a few $5 pot lid holders from Ikea, to organize all of our bakeware.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

Ikea sells organizers specifically for baking sheets (here), but we liked repurposing these instead, which don’t require anything permenant. The others had to be screwed down to the shelves. Plus, these are adjustable, meaning that while you can use them for thicker things like cake pans, you can also use them for skinny lids and baking sheets.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

We used them again, for our glass storage containers, in the drawer below the microwave.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

And since a few of you were asking about our pots and pans, here’s a little look at them. We didn’t change much here, these two drawers to the right of stove have always housed them. It’s not overly organized, but it works for us. Like I’ve said before, we’re not big on cooking at this point in our life. We both enjoy it, but finding the time just doesn’t happen. Hopefully, down the road as the girls become more independent we can change this.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

We keep our frequently used pots in the top drawer, and the others directly below.

Organized Kitchen Cabinets | Cape27Blog.com

(Lizzy photobomb)

So, how about you guys? Any organization projects going on with the new year? I say that like it’s not already February. Where does this time go??